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Category Archives: Environmental Registry

Bill 132 – Proposed Waterpower Exemption to a PTTW & Related Amendments to LRIA

These proposals are bad for communities and great for the waterpower industry. The proposed changes do not improve or strengthen the delivery of the government’s mandate to stakeholders and the public, instead it places the protection of the environment, safety and best interests of communities in the hands of the for-profit waterpower industry and individual waterpower facility owners.  The proposed changes may cut red tape but at the same time they compromise safeguards that protect public health and wellbeing, safety and the environment.

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ORA Speaks to the Legislature, Re: Omnibus Bill 132

With the warming temperatures and extreme rain and drought events that climate change is predicted to bring with increasing frequency and intensity as time passes, decision makers and legislators bear a responsibility to strengthen freshwater protection and resiliency – not weaken it.  If this proposal moves forward it will be a precipitous turning point for our future with freshwater in Ontario and beyond.

You will find ORA’s submissions regarding Bill 132 here.

Check out ORA’s speech to the Standing Committee on General Government: Continue reading


Bill 132 and Proposed Waterpower Exemption to a Permit to Take Water

With climate change impacts bearing down on us, decision makers have a responsibility to ensure the resiliency of our freshwater resources.  If this proposal moves forward it will be a precipitous turning point for our future with freshwater in Ontario and beyond.

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ERO-019-0518 – Ontario’s Sustainable Bait Management Strategy – Draft 2019

In ORA’s view, MNRF has been streamlined and restricted to the point where it becomes very challenging to effectively monitor and enforce any Bait Management Policy. It is also imperative that penalties are a sufficient deterrent and that funding is in place for sufficient staffing to effectively monitor and enforce the policy.

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ERO-013-5101 & 5102 – Discussion Paper – Modernizing the EA Program and EAA Act

The ORA is opposed to this proposal that would gut the Environmental Assessment Act (EAA) and the Environmental Assessment (EA) program.  Since the EAA was amended in 1996 there have been many official calls for an improved EAA and EA program, amongst those calls were the Environmental Commissioner for Ontario and the Auditor General of Ontario. Over this time, the EA program and EAA have become more and more streamlined, and this has led to increasing uncertainty for stakeholders and proponents.

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ERO-013-5033 – 10th Year Review of the Endangered Species Act: Proposed Changes

If enacted, the proposed changes will effectively gut the Act, result in the loss of biodiversity in the Province, eliminate most of the current protections for species at risk, and reduce the likelihood of their recovery. These draconian changes are clearly designed to restrict the number of species that are listed as at risk, to permit large-scale developers to harm species at risk and destroy their habitat, and to delay the implementation of any protection measures that remain under the Act.

The government’s claim that the proposed changes will improve outcomes for species at risk is grossly misleading.

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ERO-013-4143 – Review of the Endangered Species Act, 2007 – Joint Submission

We note, with deep concern, that environmental deregulation – making it easier for industry and development proponents to proceed with activities that harm species at risk and their habitats – appears to be the overall focus and intent of the options put forward for consideration. Reassuring statements that the review is intended to “improve protections,” “improve effectiveness” and provide “stringent protections” (p. 2) are misleading, in light of the actual proposed changes that MECP is inviting the public to consider. These include options that would undermine the very cornerstones of the law: science-based listing (including Indigenous Traditional Knowledge), mandatory habitat protection, and legislated timelines for planning and reporting. 

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