Tag Archives: ora

WIN A PRIZE – COMPLETE ORA’s SURVEY

This survey ended on May 20, 2014.  Prize winners were:

1st Draw Prize Winner was Diane Robinson

2nd Draw Prize Winner was Cornelia Granbery

Thank you to all those who participated in our Survey and Strategic Plan!!

ORA is engaged in a strategic planning process designed to make our organization more effective, more responsive to member needs, and to better enable us in our mission to address the issues that face Ontario river ecosystems.

Anyone completing the survey was included in a draw for a chance to win one of two Reproductions on Canvas by Brigitte Bere, a local Sudbury Artist.

A BIG THANK YOU TO MOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT COOP FOR YOUR SUPPORT!!

1st Draw Prize:  “Gossip” – Reproduction on Canvas  10″ x 12″

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2nd Draw Prize:  “House in Kagawong” – Reproduction on Canvas – 10″ x 10″

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Brigitte is an amazing artist, and has offered these reproductions of her work to help promote our survey!  Thank you so much for your generosity Brigitte!

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EBR 012-1120 Invasive Species Act – ORA Submission

Eurasian Milfoil

Excerpt:

ORA offers our support on the proposal to enact an Invasive Species Act (Bill 167), and to emphasize the importance of a proactive approach to minimize the possibility of intentional and unintentional introductions of alien and invasive species, and of mitigating the effects of species that have already been introduced.

For the Invasive Species Act to be effective, it is important that this legislation is accompanied by invasive species policies and implementation plans, along with collaboration between the Ontario government, ministries, agencies, municipalities and federal authorities, along with adequate funding, staff and required resources that are dedicated to the successful application of the policies and action plans. It is crucial that invasive species policy be incorporated into all decision-making processes throughout all pertinent government agencies in order to protect the economic, social and ecological integrity within all of Canada. Continue reading


Making Regulations under Subsection 36(5.2) of the Fisheries Act – ORA Submission

Lake Sturgeon

Excerpt:
“ORA respectfully offer our comments as prescribed in the Canada Gazette as listed above.

The proposed Regulations Establishing Conditions for Making Regulations under Subsection 36(5.2) of the Fisheries Act (Regulation) fundamentally alters the intent and enforceability of one of Canada’s most important federal laws. There has also been no meaningful, transparent and open process, or effort made to consult with the general public and stakeholders. As a result of the Government of Canada’s failure to consult with Canadians and those with expertise on this issue, both the Regulation and the supporting Regulatory Impact Analysis Statement are seriously flawed.

The sweeping changes to the Fisheries Act which were introduced in 2012 have weakened one of Canada’s most important and effective water and fisheries protection laws. This has provided opportunities for government to exempt industrial and resource development from federal rules.

The proposed Regulation lacks clarity and consistency, and amounts to an abdication of its federal responsibly for protecting fish, habitat and waterways in Canada. The contradictory regulatory scheme would make it impossible for any government regulator to fulfill the purpose of the Act, which is to “provide for the sustainability and ongoing productivity of commercial, recreational and Aboriginal fisheries”….. Continue reading


Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act – MNR Technical Bulletins – EBR 012-0562 – ORA Submission

Wabagishik Rapids, Vermilion River

Excerpt:  “Our intention in commenting on these bulletins is to help ensure that waterpower projects developed under the LRIA are not approved until the effects on the environment and aquatic ecosystems are fully identified, understood, and effectively mitigated.  It is also vital that the public has a mandated role and a voice in these processes.

It is also disturbing that the MNR is considering all responsibility for fish habitat and fish passage as out of scope, and is divesting its interests by way of these bulletins, with no clear MNR role mentioned, to the Department of Oceans and Fisheries (DFO).  This is at a time when the federal government has just announced the signing of a memorandum of understanding between the DFO and the National Energy Board (NEB) to relinquish much of its oversight of fish habitat along pipeline corridors.  This news was quietly released just before Christmas, and only highlights the need for the Ontario government to look after its own interests and not rely on federal protection for any of our crown resources.  Unfortunately many elements of these bulletins do the very opposite.  It is even more disturbing that this deferral was carried out despite the Fish Habitat Compliance and Referral Protocols for Ontario which was approved by government and identifies and enables roles for MNR in the matters of fish habitat and fish passage.

The exercise of reviewing these technical bulletins has been very disturbing to say the least.  It is as though the bulletins were written by the waterpower industry instead of MNR. This series of bulletins reflect an abdication of the MNRs responsibilities under the Lakes and Rivers Improvement Act (LRIA).

It is ORA’s view that this government must continue to play a strong role in ensuring effective mitigation of the impacts of development to meet their strategic directions for sustainable development; and certainly that will be what Ontario taxpayers expect.  It is vital that these bulletins reflect a commitment for inter-governmental cooperation, in a holistic and collaborative way, to ensure there are no gaps in fulfilling all responsibilities and commitments legislated under LRIA.”

Continue reading


American Eel Recovery Strategy – EBR Posting 012-0405 – ORA Submission

American Eel

Excerpt:

“American Eels were once abundant in the upper St. Lawrence River, Ottawa River, Lake Ontario, and their tributaries, and in fact were so plentiful that they were an invaluable source of sustenance to First Nation communities and early European settlers, and more recently supported thriving commercial and sports fisheries.  This all changed with the advent of a multitude of hydroelectric dams constructed within the historic range of the species.

Key to the American Eel’s survival and recovery is its ability to migrate to its spawning area in the Sargasso Sea, near Bermuda.  This is a perilous journey that only a very small percentage ever complete due to the cumulative effects of the numerous hydroelectric facilities that have killed, maimed, and cut off migration to their spawning area.  Consequently their once thriving populations have been reduced to a mere one percent of their original numbers.” Continue reading



MEC grant will help protect Ontario Rivers – ORA

For immediate release – December 5, 2013

MEC grant will help protect Ontario rivers

Ontario Rivers Alliance (ORA) has received nearly $35,000 from Mountain Equipment Co-op (MEC) to help the organization become more effective in its efforts to protect the province’s rivers. The grant will allow ORA to undertake several initiatives, including strategic and fundraising planning, rebranding and website development, and outreach/membership development.

“We are so pleased that MEC has provided this important opportunity for ORA to take our organization to the next level,” ORA Chair Linda Heron says. “This grant will help us build a strong foundation for strategic growth and effectiveness.  I see a very bright future for this organization.”

Ontario Rivers Alliance has formed a strong network of environmental, stewardship, and conservation organizations to share, communicate, collaborate, and join our voices, experience and strengths in a coordinated effort to address policy, risky or threatening developments, and unhealthy river ecosystems. Continue reading


Surging Sturgeon Success Story – by Laurent Robichaud, Friends of Grassy River

Below is a presentation made to the Ontario Rivers Alliance at their Annual General Meeting on 23 November 2013.  Check out the notes below as well.

Download (PDF, 6.59MB)

This document is a collection of events and recent developments related to the re-introduction of Lake Sturgeon in the Upper Reach of the Mattagami River near Timmins Ontario.

It was back in 2002 that the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources approached Club Navigateur La Ronde and the Timmins Fur Council to be partners on a project to re-establish lake sturgeon population in the upper reach of the Mattagami River near Timmins Ontario. In the Lands and Forest archives of the early 1900s were records of sturgeon spawning activity observed at Wawaitin Falls by a conservation officer of those early years of the Porcupine mining camp. Log drives, dam construction and subsequent operation combined with fisheries led to population drops to unsustainable levels. Continue reading


Mountain Equipment Coop has awarded a $34,895 grant to Ontario Rivers Alliance for a Capacity Building Project

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Mountain Equipment Coop (MEC) has just awarded a $34,895 grant to Ontario Rivers Alliance (ORA) for a Capacity Building Project.  The grant was awarded through the MEC Community Involvement Fund.

We are very happy to welcome Carrie Regenstreif aboard as our lead in this pivotal Project.

This Capacity Building Project will enable ORA to undertake strategic planning, branding, membership/partnership development and fundraising to increase our capacity to protect, conserve and restore healthy Ontario river ecosystems.

A newsletter will also be developed to help keep our membership informed of current issues and developments.

ORA wishes to send out a BIG thank you to MEC for their generous support of ORA and our Capacity Building Project.


Wabagishik Rapids Generating Station – Environmental Report – ORA Part II Order request

Wabagishik Rapids, Vermilion River – Proposed Dam Site

Excerpt:  “This project has not been planned in an environmentally responsible manner, and has not fully taken into account the interests of local stakeholders and the public. Therefore, it is our position that for all the reasons noted herein, Xeneca has not fulfilled its requirements under the Class EA for Waterpower.”

Continue reading