Category Archives: East Channel

ORA Support for the East Branch Weir Removal Project, Eramosa River

Conceptual illustration, by Linda Hendry

The East Branch Weir Removal Project on the Eramosa River is moving ahead.  We are pleased to report that all funding is in place, and the Project will be complete within a few days.  An excellent outcome for the East Channel and for the community.

The Save the East Channel group and ORA worked with the Eden Mills Eramosa River Conservation Association (EMERCA) to find an environmentally sustainable solution that would improve flow and connectivity in the East Channel.

Follow the links below for additional information about the project:
Community Group Planning Eramosa River Naturalization Project, Wellington Adviser, 7 Aug. 2020
EMERCA Facebook Page:  Facebook.com/EdenMillsERCA

ORA provided a letter of support for the EMERCA grant application for the Project’s funding – see below:

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Save the East Channel of the Eramosa River

Upper Dam diverts flow from East Channel into West Channel of Eramosa River

Upper Dam diverts flow from East Channel into West Channel of Eramosa River

The East Channel is a stretch of the Eramosa River that runs through the village of Eden Mills, between Rockwood and the city of Guelph.  The East Channel was once a pristine river ecosystem; however, for years, it  has been in a state of decline.  Why?  Because a private dam was built without an environmental assessment or permits in the early 1990s, and blocks water from flowing down into the East Channel during the low flow summer months when the river and aquatic life need it the most.  Even though there could be as much as 20 inches of water in the river at the entrance of the East Channel, the Upper Dam blocks the flow completely at those times.  This dam continues to cause significant and alarming environmental harm to the East Channel’s river ecosystem. Continue reading


Eramosa River Upper Dam – East Channel, Eden Mills – Safety Issues

ORA submits that these photos demonstrate that this dam has very questionable flood control value; however, it does place the safety of the public and property at significant risk in the event of a full breach. Ultimately the owner of the Upper Dam is responsible; however, it is also incumbent upon the MNRF, and all involved, to act quickly to ensure that all the necessary measures are taken to secure the safety of the public.

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