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Category Archives: Rivers at Risk

Join ORA: Adam Shoalts – #1 Best Selling Author & Wilderness Legend

Adam Shoalts, Author and Wilderness Legend

ORA ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

SPEAKER: ADAM SHOALTS – #1 BEST SELLING AUTHOR
Saturday, 22 October 2022
Free – Limited Seats

AGM at 10:00 am – Keynote Speaker at 10:30 am

REGISTER NOW TO SAVE YOUR SEAT!


ADAM SHOALTS: A well-known explorer, adventurer, conservationist and bestselling author.  Adam will join us to share stories of his expeditions in Canada’s wilderness and talk about the importance of preserving wild rivers from remote hinterlands to our own backyards.

BIO: Best known for his long solo canoe journeys, including crossing nearly 4,000 km of Canada’s Arctic alone, Adam Shoalts is the Westaway Explorer-in-Residence of the Royal Canadian Geographical Society, and a regular guest on television and radio. His national bestselling books include Beyond the Trees: A Journey Alone Across Canada’s Arctic, A History of Canada in 10 Maps, and The Whisper on the Night Wind. A geographer, historian and archaeologist, Shoalts has a PhD in History from McMaster University.

Register here to reserve your seat.

All registrants will receive an Agenda one week before the AGM.

All members wishing to vote at the AGM must renew their membership by 21 October 2022.

Drop us a line if you interested in joining our Board of Directors at info@ontarioriversalliance.ca   

                                              


Erin WWTP – Environmental Compliance Approval – Joint

Photo by Steven Noakes – West Credit River Brook Trout

The Coalition for the West Credit River (Coalition) remains very concerned with the potential environmental impact of the Erin Water Resource Recovery Facility (WRRF) and, in particular, the temperature of its treated effluent harming the sensitive coldwater Brook Trout habitat of the West Credit River. 

As your Ministry is aware, the approved sewage treatment plant proposes to discharge large flows of sewage effluent into the relatively small flow of the West Credit River. The lack of significant dilution will greatly magnify the thermal impact of warm effluent on this coldwater stream. 

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Environmental Compliance Approval Number 7877-CALRZU – Erin Water Resource Recovery Facility – Joint

Photo by Steven Noakes

First, the Coalition for the West Credit River (Coalition) would like to express our deepest appreciation that you and your staff worked with our Technical Team over the last several months to incorporate some of our recommendations into the Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA). However, we are concerned that our key recommendations for improvements to the draft ECA, received by you on 2 May, were not reflected in the ECA approved on 3 May 2022. 

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Delegation Request – Erin Water Resource Recovery Facility – Joint

Photo by Steven Noakes

The Coalition is very appreciative of your strong support in recommending to the Honourable David Piccini, Minister of Environment, Conservation Parks (MECP) and Mayor Allan Alls, Town of Erin, that our draft Monitoring and Adaptive Management Plan be integrated into the Environmental Compliance Approval (ECA). As you are likely aware, the ECA for the Erin Water Resource Recovery Facility was approved on 3 May 2022 by Aziz Ahmed, P.Eng., MECP Manager of Municipal Water & Wastewater Permissions, appointed for the purposes of Part II.1 of the Environmental Protection Act. 

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Hydroelectric Program Development and Assessment – IESO Small Hydro Program

First, it was enlightening to be provided with a clear definition of small and large hydro facilities in the Hydroelectric Program Development and Assessment webinar, as well as a total amount of power generated by these categories. You informed that the definition of small hydro would have a scope of installed capacity of 10 MW and under, with 30 companies representing 50 facilities generating a total of 120 to 150 MW, and large hydro having a scope of installed capacity of over 10 MW, with 3 companies representing 22 facilities producing a total of 1,000 MW. 

The increased number of small hydro facilities making such a small contribution to our electricity grid impacts on multiple Ontario riverine ecosystems, whereas the 22 facilities producing 1,000 MW of power on presumably fewer rivers has a much lower trade-off value. Additionally, larger rivers have a greater capacity to buffer some of the worse effects of hydroelectric. 

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ERO 019-4971 – Draft Low Impact Development Stormwater Management Manual

Blue Heron in Waterloo, Ontario, by Leslie Bamford

The ORA is in full agreement that Low Impact Development (LID) must be a priority in development planning guidance for stormwater management practices and should include innovative green infrastructure such as rain harvesting, rain gardens, green roofs, urban trees and forests, permeable surfaces, ditches, swales, stormwater catchments, and must emphasize the protection of wetlands.

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A Clean Electricity Standard in support of a net-zero electricity sector – Discussion Paper

When people refer to hydroelectric as clean, it’s usually in the context of GHG emissions; however, governments and utilities often use the term categorically and without caveat or qualification. Using the word “clean” in this context is misleading. Just because hydroelectric facilities are not spewing out smoke does not mean they are clean or renewable.  In fact, waterpower has resulted in significant and ongoing impacts on water quality, water quantity, ecological processes, fish and wildlife populations and habitat, and to aboriginal communities. Hydroelectric also makes a significant daily contribution to the earth’s accumulation of greenhouse gases (GHG) in our atmosphere.

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ERO-019-4967 – Municipal Wastewater and Stormwater Management in Ontario – Discussion Paper

The province should not be streamlining reporting requirements. Wastewater and stormwater management are vitally important to the health and resilience of our freshwater resources and to the people of Ontario. There are numerous complex and site specific considerations for each and every outfall of sewage effluent that is unique to the area and the water body. We cannot continue to release partially treated or untreated sewage into our lakes and rivers. We must stop thinking about how we can make it easier and start thinking about how we can make wastewater treatment more efficient and effective so we can build resilience into our lakes and rivers to help prepare for a warming climate. 

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Agnico Eagle Upper Beaver Gold Project – Tailored Impact Statement Guidelines & Public Participation Plan

The Agency has deemed the Project to be within federal jurisdiction and required it to undergo a federal Impact Assessment, and yet Agnico Eagle (AE) is planning to move forward with their advanced exploration as soon as weather permits. ORA objects to the Project moving forward with any advanced exploration activities that would result in any damage to the environment.

AE boasts about setting the “gold standard”, “for over 60 years Agnico Eagle has been attracting investment to Canada, from those who seek a mining company committed to make mining work better for communities, shareholders and the planet”.[1]  ORA submits that Stakeholders expect AE to set the “gold standard” on this Project by undertaking the most environmentally and socially rigorous, advanced and responsible project “for communities, shareholders and the planet”. [1] Agnico Eagle Twitter Posting, 22 November 2021
ORA comments requesting a federal review under the Impact Assessment Act, 2 October 2021.
Upper Beaver Gold Project – IAAC Portal.

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ERO-019-4978 – Subwatershed Planning Guide

The ORA is very supportive of policy and legislation that provides an ecosystem approach for planning at a watershed and subwatershed scale. It is essential that we ensure a healthy environment, with clean and abundant freshwater resources, that helps to provide resilience to the extremes of climate change.  We are appreciative of the information webinar on the Subwatershed Planning Guide, and the 45-day comment period.

Overall, we are generally supportive of the draft guidelines as they seem broad ranging and comprehensive.  We are especially pleased to see the partnership approach with Indigenous peoples included in the Guide and agree that this approach will lead to a much more comprehensive subwatershed plan.

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